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  • Even after classes have commenced, course descriptions and online syllabus information may be subject to change according to the size of each class and the students' comprehension level.

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Course Information

Year 2017  School Center for International Education
Course Title
Summer Session (Culture I) 01

Instructor TRAPHAGAN, John Willis
Term/Day/Period summer quarter  othersothers
Category Global Studies Eligible Year 1st year and above Credits 2
Classroom 実施場所未定 Campus waseda
Course Key 9800005007 Course Class Code 01
Main Language English
  Course Code CMFC101L
First Academic disciplines Composite Fields Studies
Second Academic disciplines Culture
Third Academic disciplines Introduction
Level Beginner, initial or introductory Types of lesson Lecture
  Open Courses

Syllabus Information

Latest Update:2017/01/13 16:49:16

Subtitle Japanese Culture and Society
Course Outline COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is intended as an introduction to the diversity of culture and lifestyles that exist in Japan. We briefly explore the concept of culture used in anthropology and then move to an application of that concept to the Japanese context. Our aim will be to develop a general understanding of the complexities of the Japanese experience by looking at elements such as kinship and family, internal migration and immigration, political organization, gender, aging and death, education, ethnicity, and identity. One significant aim of the course is to develop a deep understanding of the dramatic demographic change Japan is experiencing and how this is influencing life in rural (and urban) parts of the country.  We will combine readings, lectures and critical discussion to think about ways in which the Japanese inhabit and contest cultural frames.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

At only a little over four weeks, this class is very short.  Thus, we will not have a large number of assignments.  There will be three quizzes and one group assignment.

Quizzes:  There will be three quizzes in this class that take place on Wednesday of each week for the first three weeks.  The quizzes are worth 30% of your grade.

Group Observation Poster:  You will be required to do a small ethnographic observation project as part of a group of four or five students.  This is worth 40% of your grade for the course.  You can visit a shrine, temple, baseball game, bunraku, tea ceremony, samisen concert, stores in Akihabara, etc.  Look for something interesting.  There are many things to see in Tokyo.  If you have selected the optional field trip, you may develop your poster based upon that trip, but given the group nature of this project a minimum of two members of your group must be going on the trip. 

Your objective is to observe something interesting and analyze the event you observe in terms of: 1) specific details of the event observed, 2) what you think the event/place can tell us about Japanese culture and society, and 3) what you think is most important about the observations you report.    This project is analytical.  The goal is to get you thinking about culture in general and Japanese culture in particular and to give you an opportunity to experience some aspect of Japanese culture you might not otherwise encounter while you are here in Tokyo.  You should cite at least two of the readings from class (or another scholarly reading that you select) to support the argument/point you present in your poster. 

You will need to produce an abstract that identifies the research project and explains how your group will conduct the research, a paper that summarizes the main points covered in your poster, and a poster presentation to the class.  The abstract is no more than one page and is worth 10% of the project grade. It should have a title, names of the group members, and a brief description of the project.  It is due 5 July 2017 at the beginning of class. 

The poster presentation is worth the remaining 90% of the grade.   Each group (of 4 or 5 members) will participate in a poster session that will be held in WGG.  We will designate 80 minutes for the poster session, and you should arrange for each student to stand with the poster for approximately 15 minutes in order to answer questions other students and guests have.  This will be open to the public.  Students who are not standing with their groups’ posters will walk through the entire poster area and ask questions about the other groups’ posters. 
Objectives Develop a broad understanding of main themes in contemporary Japanese culture and society.
Course Schedule
1:
26 – 30 June 2017: Japanese Social Organization
Readings: Some Implications of Japanese Social Structure, Marion J. Levy, Jr., The American Sociologist
Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 2000), pp. 18-31
2:
26 – 30 June 2017: Japanese Social Organization
Readings: Some Implications of Japanese Social Structure, Marion J. Levy, Jr., The American Sociologist
Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 2000), pp. 18-31
3:
26 – 30 June 2017: Japanese Social Organization
Readings: Some Implications of Japanese Social Structure, Marion J. Levy, Jr., The American Sociologist
Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 2000), pp. 18-31
4:
26 – 30 June 2017: Japanese Social Organization
Readings: Some Implications of Japanese Social Structure, Marion J. Levy, Jr., The American Sociologist
Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 2000), pp. 18-31
5:
3 – 7 July 2017: Education
Abstract for Group project due on 5 July.  

Readings:
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805.  
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial).  

Yuki Honda. 2003. The Reality of the Japanese School-to-Work Transition System at the Turn of the Century: Necessary Disillusionment.  Social Science Japan. February: 8-12.
Traphagan, John W.  2015. The Japanese Government’s Attack on the Humanities and Social Sciences.  The Diplomat.
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805.  
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial).  
6:
3 – 7 July 2017: Education
Abstract for Group project due on 5 July. 

Readings:
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 

Yuki Honda. 2003. The Reality of the Japanese School-to-Work Transition System at the Turn of the Century: Necessary Disillusionment.  Social Science Japan. February: 8-12.
Traphagan, John W.  2015. The Japanese Government’s Attack on the Humanities and Social Sciences.  The Diplomat.
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 
7:
3 – 7 July 2017: Education
Abstract for Group project due on 5 July. 

Readings:
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 

Yuki Honda. 2003. The Reality of the Japanese School-to-Work Transition System at the Turn of the Century: Necessary Disillusionment.  Social Science Japan. February: 8-12.
Traphagan, John W.  2015. The Japanese Government’s Attack on the Humanities and Social Sciences.  The Diplomat.
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 
8:
3 – 7 July 2017: Education
Abstract for Group project due on 5 July. 

Readings:
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 

Yuki Honda. 2003. The Reality of the Japanese School-to-Work Transition System at the Turn of the Century: Necessary Disillusionment.  Social Science Japan. February: 8-12.
Traphagan, John W.  2015. The Japanese Government’s Attack on the Humanities and Social Sciences.  The Diplomat.
Japan Times.  2014.  Reported Cases of Bullying at Elementary Schools Hits Record high 118,805. 
Japan Times.  2014.  School Bullying On The Increase (editorial). 
9:
10 – 14 July 2017: Demographic Change
Readings:
Traphagan, John W. 2013. Japan's Demographic Nightmare.  The Diplomat.
Masahiro Yamada and Yuji Genda. 2000. A debate on Japan's Dependent Singles. Japan Echo, June: 47-56.
Traphagan, John W.. 1998. "Contesting the Transition to Old Age in Japan." Ethnology 37(4): 333-350.
10:
10 – 14 July 2017: Demographic Change
Readings:
Traphagan, John W. 2013. Japan's Demographic Nightmare.  The Diplomat.
Masahiro Yamada and Yuji Genda. 2000. A debate on Japan's Dependent Singles. Japan Echo, June: 47-56.
Traphagan, John W.. 1998. "Contesting the Transition to Old Age in Japan." Ethnology 37(4): 333-350.
11:
10 – 14 July 2017: Demographic Change
Readings:
Traphagan, John W. 2013. Japan's Demographic Nightmare.  The Diplomat.
Masahiro Yamada and Yuji Genda. 2000. A debate on Japan's Dependent Singles. Japan Echo, June: 47-56.
Traphagan, John W.. 1998. "Contesting the Transition to Old Age in Japan." Ethnology 37(4): 333-350.
12:
10 – 14 July 2017: Demographic Change
Readings:
Traphagan, John W. 2013. Japan's Demographic Nightmare.  The Diplomat.
Masahiro Yamada and Yuji Genda. 2000. A debate on Japan's Dependent Singles. Japan Echo, June: 47-56.
Traphagan, John W.. 1998. "Contesting the Transition to Old Age in Japan." Ethnology 37(4): 333-350.
13:
17 – 20 July 2017: Religion and Society
Readings:
Readings: Connor, Blaine P. and John W. Traphagan. 2014. Negotiating the Afterlife: Emplacement as Process in Contemporary Japan. Asian Anthropology 13(1):1-17.
Letters to the Gods: The Form and Meaning of Ema
Author(s): Ian Reader
Source: Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 24-50
14:
17 – 20 July 2017: Religion and Society
Readings:
Readings: Connor, Blaine P. and John W. Traphagan. 2014. Negotiating the Afterlife: Emplacement as Process in Contemporary Japan. Asian Anthropology 13(1):1-17.
Letters to the Gods: The Form and Meaning of Ema
Author(s): Ian Reader
Source: Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 24-50 
15:
17 – 20 July 2017: Religion and Society
Readings:
Readings: Connor, Blaine P. and John W. Traphagan. 2014. Negotiating the Afterlife: Emplacement as Process in Contemporary Japan. Asian Anthropology 13(1):1-17.
Letters to the Gods: The Form and Meaning of Ema
Author(s): Ian Reader
Source: Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 24-50
Textbooks Readings are supplementary to class lectures. We may not discuss a specific reading in class, but you should keep up on readings. Content from readings will be included in the quizzes
Reference None
Evaluation
Rate Evaluation Criteria
Exam: 30% Weekly quizzes
evaluated on content and qualitiy of understanding
Class Participation: 30% Class Participation
baed on attendance
Others: 40% Group Presentation
evaluated on quality of presentation, research, content
Note / URL Main Language: English

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