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Course Information

Year 2017  School Center for International Education
Course Title
Summer Session (Culture III) 01

Instructor LIM, Tai Wei
Term/Day/Period summer quarter  othersothers
Category Global Studies Eligible Year 1st year and above Credits 2
Classroom 実施場所未定 Campus waseda
Course Key 9800005009 Course Class Code 01
Main Language English
  Course Code CMFC131L
First Academic disciplines Composite Fields Studies
Second Academic disciplines Culture
Third Academic disciplines Cultural Studies
Level Beginner, initial or introductory Types of lesson Lecture
  Open Courses

Syllabus Information

Latest Update:2017/01/13 17:17:25

Subtitle Japanese popular culture: globalization, cultural production/consumption & creative ecology
Course Outline The duration of the course is: 26 June 2017 - 20 July 2017. Course Outline.
Abstract
This course is centered round an interdisciplinary area studies (specifically Japanese studies) approach to studying Japanese popular culture. It is divided into three main sections. For its conceptual and theoretical approach, the Japanese studies course employs area studies perspectives in ethnography, globalization studies, historical perspectives and cultural studies to examine the subject matter. In examining the ideas of globalization, the course critically looks at the ethnography and ecology of creative production through Ian Condry’s seminal work on anime industry. In terms of mechanisms of dissemination, it then examines how globalization facilitated the popularity and proliferation of Japanese ACG (Anime, Comics, Games) products through Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto’s edited volume and William Tsutsui’s accessible text (e.g. concepts of hybridization) on this topic. The last section of the course will focus on some case studies of popular cultural products. How do features of these products resonate with local audiences in East Asia and North America? Doraemon and Godzilla are also useful case studies in this area. The course will also critically examine fandom consumption in Anne Allison’s case study of Pikachu’s success in North America.
Objectives Objectives:
-To critically examine the concepts of globalization, cultural production and creative ecology in Japanese popular cultural industries.
-To critically analyze popular cultural consumption by contemporary Japanese and overseas fandom
-To critically examine major theoretical debates related to the subject matter and discuss their major contributions and potential critiques.
Course Schedule
1:
INTRODUCTION.
Introduction of the syllabus, its requirements and some multimedia presentation of the course.

Reading:
Condry, Ian, The Soul of Anime (Durham and London: Duke University Press), 2013, pp. 112-134
2:
ETHNOGRAPHY OF ANIME
Reading:
Condry, Ian, The Soul of Anime (Durham and London: Duke University Press), 2013, pp.161-184
Chapter Six Dark Energy: What Overseas Fans Reveal about the Copyright Wars

--------------------------------------------------------


Reading:
Condry, Ian, The Soul of Anime (Durham and London: Duke University Press), 2013, pp. 185-217
Chapter Seven Love Revolution: Otaku Fans in Japan, pp. 185-203
Conclusion Future Anime: Collaborative Creativity and Cultural Action, pp. 204-217
3:
GLOBALIZATION THEME
Reading: Tsutsui, William M., Japanese popular culture and globalization (Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies), 2010
Chapters covered:
•Forms and themes in Japanese popular culture
• Historical roots
• Postwar popular culture
• Themes in Japanese pop
• Sources of the Japanese pop imagination
Reading: Tsutsui, William M., Japanese popular culture and globalization (Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies), 2010
Chapters covered:
• Japanese culture, Western models
• The legacies of defeat
• Change and subversion
• The global appeal of Japanese popular culture
• Quality, content, and difference
4:
GLOBALIZATION THEME
Reading: Tsutsui, William M., Japanese popular culture and globalization (Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies), 2010
Chapters covered:
• Familiarity and the media marketplace
• The smell of pop
• American trauma, Japanese pop
• A world of fans
• Lost in translation? : adapting Japanese popular culture for global audiences

Reading: Tsutsui, William M., Japanese popular culture and globalization (Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies), 2010
Chapters covered:
• Dubbing, editing, censoring
• Lovable kooks, enduring stereotypes
• Remade in America
• Japan as soft superpower
• The Japanese state and popular culture
• The economics of Japanese pop
• Soft power, hard realities.
5:
Trip to Akihabara
Trip to Akihabara. (2nd week 5th and 6th lessons) including Tokyo Anime Center; 03-5298-1188; Soto-Kanda 4-14-1, Akihabara UDX 4F.
6:
Trip to Akihabara
Trip to Akihabara. (2nd week 5th and 6th lessons) including Tokyo Anime Center; 03-5298-1188; Soto-Kanda 4-14-1, Akihabara UDX 4F.
7:
Trip to Harajuku and Ura-Harajuku
Harajuku and Ura-Harajuku.(2nd week 7th and 8th lessons)
8:
Trip to Harajuku and Ura-Harajuku
Harajuku and Ura-Harajuku.(2nd week 7th and 8th lessons)
9:
Reading
Allen, Matthew and Rumi Sakamoto, “Introduction: Inside-out Japan? Popular Culture and globalization in the context of Japan” in Popular Culture, Globalization and Japan edited by Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto (Great Britain: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group), 2006, pp. 1-12

Iwabuchi, Koichi, “Japanese popular culture and postcolonial desire for ‘Asia’” in Popular Culture, Globalization and Japan edited by Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto (Great Britain: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group), 2006, pp. 15-35.
10:
Reading
Sunaoshi, Yukako, “Who reads comics? Manga readership among first-generation Asian immigrants in New Zealand” in Popular Culture, Globalization and Japan edited by Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto (Great Britain: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group), 2006, pp. 94-114

-Case study of Doraemon: the concept of resonance and collective experience
Shiraishi, Saya S., "Doraemon Goes Abroad" in Japan Pop!: Inside the world of Japanese popular culture (edited by Timothy J. Craig) (NY: East Gate), 2000, pp. 287-308
Case study of Godzilla and nuclear energy
11:
CASE STUDIES
Case study of Pokemon and globalization
-Allison, Anne, “Gotta Catch ‘Em All”: The Pokemonization of America (and the World)” and “Epilogue” in Millennial Monsters (Berkeley, LA and London: University of California Press), 2006, pp. 234-280.
-Napier, Susan, "Introduction" and "When Godzilla Speaks" in In Godzilla's Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage edited by William M. Tsutsui and Michiko Ito (NY and Hampshire England: Palgrave Macillan), 2006, pp. 1-20.
12:
Presentations of essay project
Presentations of essay project
13:
Presentations of essay project.
Presentations of essay project
14:
Presentations of essay project
Presentations of essay project
15:
Conclusion
Conclusion to the course and class participants’ peer review of presentations of essay project.
Textbooks Textbooks:
-Allen, Matthew and Rumi Sakamoto, Popular Culture, Globalization and Japan edited by Matthew Allen and Rumi Sakamoto (Great Britain: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group), 2006
-Condry, Ian, The Soul of Anime (Durham and London: Duke University Press), 2013
-Tsutsui, William M., Japanese popular culture and globalization (Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies), 2010

※Related sections of the textbooks will be distributed.

Reference Readings in the course:
-Allison, Anne, “Gotta Catch ‘Em All”: The Pokemonization of America (and the World)” and “Epilogue” in Millennial Monsters (Berkeley, LA and London: University of California Press), 2006, pp. 234-280.
-Hornyak, Timothy N., "Chapter 6 Humanoids at home", in Loving the Machine the Art and Science of Japanese Robots (Tokyo, NY, London: Kodansha), 2006, pp. 85-100 (15 pages)
-Napier, Susan, "Introduction" and "When Godzilla Speaks" in In Godzilla's Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage edited by William M. Tsutsui and MIchiko Ito (NY and Hampshire England: Palgrave Macillan), 2006, pp. 1-20.
-Napier, Susan Jolliffe (2006) ‘Matter Out of Place: Carnival, Containment, and Cultural Recovery in Miyazaki's Spirited Away’, Journal of Japanese Studies 32(2): 287-310
-Op de Beeck, Natalie (2009) ‘Anima and Anime: Environmental Perspectives and New Frontiers, in
Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away’, in Mark I. West (ed.) The Japanification of Children's Popular
Culture: From Godzilla to Miyazaki. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, pp.267-284.
-Shiraishi, Saya S., "Doraemon Goes Abroad" in Japan Pop!: Inside the world of Japanese popular culture (edited by Timothy J. Craig) (NY: East Gate), 2000, pp. 287-308

Additional non-essential resources:
-McGray, Douglas, "Japan's Gross National Cool" dated 1 May 2002 in Foreign Policy (Washington: FP), 2002, available at http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2002/05/01/japans_gross_national_cool?page=0%2C5&sms_ss=email&at_xt=4dd367f716e46169%2C0
Evaluation
Rate Evaluation Criteria
Exam: 50% Evaluation.
---Take home exam paper 50%. Question provided on week 5 and due on week 9. 1000 word response, including footnotes and bibliography.
(1 broadly-constructed essay question to elicit response from class participation)
CRITERIA FOR ESSAY GRADING
*Issues clearly identified?
*clear and logical framework for organizing discussion?
*appropriate material selected?
*wide reading from many sources?
*linking of material between sections?
*Argumentation and analysis?
*Coherence?
*Logically related answer?
*sophisticated analysis?
*new ideas and innovative thinking?
*processing of information: relationship of facts or concepts?
*balanced without dogmatism?
*support from literature?
Class Participation: 25% Class participation 25%
Evaluation criteria: based on active class attendance and engagement in class discussions and debates.
Others: 25% Presentation 25%;
Based on presentation of essay project, grading criteria for the Powerpoint (PPT) presentation are:
CRITERIA FOR PRESENTATION GRADING
-Issues clearly identified?
*Clear and logical framework for organizing discussion?
*Argumentation and analysis?
*Coherence?
*Processing of information: relationship of facts or concepts?
*Balanced without dogmatism?
Note / URL Main Language: English. The instructor accepts class/tutorial questions and points of clarifications in Chinese, Cantonese and Japanese. 

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