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Course Information

Year 2017  School Center for International Education
Course Title
Summer Session (History I) 01

Instructor LIM, Tai Wei
Term/Day/Period summer quarter  othersothers
Category Global Studies Eligible Year 1st year and above Credits 2
Classroom 実施場所未定 Campus waseda
Course Key 9800005010 Course Class Code 01
Main Language English
  Course Code HISA141L
First Academic disciplines History
Second Academic disciplines Japanese History
Third Academic disciplines Modern History
Level Beginner, initial or introductory Types of lesson Lecture
  Open Courses

Syllabus Information

Latest Update:2017/01/13 17:29:34

Subtitle The Contemporary History of Heisei Japan:An area studies approach in examining historical transitions in postwar and contemporary Japan
Course Outline This historical survey and area studies course introduces class participants to selected issues and developments in contemporary Japan. It studies the crucial debates, challenges and trends that have shaped the Japanese history, including developmental history, natural disaster recovery, environmental perspectives, demographics, culture and society. It does not pretend to be comprehensive but utilizes these selected issues to motivate class participants to analyze critically contemporary Japan from eclectic perspectives. Two focused cases studies, the Great East Japan Earthquake recovery as well as the demographic transition in Japan, will be discussed in the course. Embedded in the course are fieldtrips and video presentation for the experiential learning experience.
Objectives -state, recognize, recall and tell the main features of postwar Japan. Participants are expected to analyze the challenges faced by postwar and contemporary Japan and how they were surmounted successfully.
-recognize, describe and clarify the strengths and weaknesses, the advantages and disadvantages of the features and characteristics of contemporary Japan.
-compare and contrast Japanese developmental phases in the postwar years.
-apply, relate and deepen their appreciation of the significance of the dynamics and interaction of selected Japanese political, social, environmental, demographic developments. Deepen their appreciation of the significance of major developments within Japan. Deepen their appreciation of the significance of the dynamics of Japan’s domestic society, economy and politics; its interaction with its neighboring region and the rest of the world; examine Japan’s coping mechanisms in interacting with globalization and major recent world trends.
-analyze Japan's structure, policies, economy, society and current trends. Analyze the causes and effects of internal and external influences on Japan's development. Analyze the challenges that Japan faces, its ways of managing them and the resulting innovative features. Develop analytical frameworks for these analyses.
-generalize, reflect and hypothesize their own conclusions with regards to the course materials and contemporary issues
Course Schedule
1:
*
Reading:
Kingston, Jeff, Contemporary Japan: History, Politics, and Social Change since the 1980s, Second Edition (US: Wiley-Blackwell), 2012

Part I Introduction 1
1 Transformations After World War II 3
2 The Lost Decade 23
Part II Risk and Consequences 39
3 Defusing the Demographic Time Bomb 41
4 Families at Risk 60
5 Jobs at Risk 77

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:
Johnson, Chalmers, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (California: Stanford University Press), 1982, pp. 4-34
2:
*
Reading:
Kingston, Jeff, Contemporary Japan: History, Politics, and Social Change since the 1980s, Second Edition (US: Wiley-Blackwell), 2012

Part IV Environment and Disaster 175
10 Environmental Issues 177
11 3/11: Earthquake, Tsunami, and Nuclear Crisis 198

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Ministry of the Environment Japan, Lessons from Minamata Disease and Mercury Management in Japan (Japan: Ministry of the Environment), 2013
3:
*
Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012

Introduction, Jeff Kingston
Part I. Disaster: Reports from Tohoku
1. Tohoku Diary: Reportage on the Tohoku Disaster, Gerald Curtis
pp. 13-32
2. Recovery in Tohoku, John F. Morris
pp. 33-50

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Leonard, Herman B. "Dutch", "Preliminary Observations on the Japanese 3/11 Earthquake and Tsunami" dated 12 March 2011 in Harvard Kennedy School Program on Crisis Leadership [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015], available at http://www.ash.harvard.edu/extension/ash/docs/earthquake.pdf

----------------------------------------------------------------
Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012
Part II. Volunteerism, Civil Society and Media
3. From Kobe to Tohoku: The Potential and the Peril of a Volunteer Infrastructure, Simon Avenell
pp. 51-77
4. Civil Society and the Triple Disasters: Revealed Strengths and Weaknesses, Yuko Kawato, Robert Pekkanen and Yutaka Tsujinaka
pp. 78-93

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Tatsuki, Shigeo, "The Kobe Earthquake and the Renaissance of Volunteerism in Japan" dated March 2000 in Kwasei Gakuin website [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015], available at http://www.kwansei.ac.jp/s_sociology/kiyou/87/87-ch12.pdf, pp. 185-196
Osa, Yukie, "The Growing Role of NGOs in Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance in East Asia" in Japan Center for International Exchange (JCIE/USA) website [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015] (Japan: JCIE),  available at http://www.jcie.org/researchpdfs/growingforce/5_Osa.pdf, pp. 66-89 [Read mainly the part on Japan]
4:
*
Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012
5. Social Media in Disaster Japan, David H. Slater, Nishimura Keiko and Love Kindstrand
pp. 94-103
6. March 11, 2011 Online: Comparing Japanese Newspaper Websites and International News Websites, Leslie M. Tkach-Kawasaki
pp. 109-124

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Matanle, P., "The great east Japan earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear metldown: Towards the (re)construction of a safe, sustainable, and compassionate society in Japan's shrinking regions" in Local Environment 16 (9), pp. 823-847

----------------------------------------------------------------

Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012
Part III. Energy
7. Networks of Power: Institutions and Local Residents in Post-Tohoku Japan, Daniel P. Aldrich
pp. 125-139
8. Hard Choices: Japan's Post-Fukushima Energy Policy in the 21st Century, Paul J. Scalise
pp. 140-155
9. Fukushima and the Political Economy of Power Policy in Japan, Andrew Dewitt, Iida Tetsunari and Masuru Kaneko
pp. 156-172

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Fukurai, Hiroshi, "Introduction The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Disaster and the future of Nuclear Energy Programs in Japan and East Asia" dated June 2012 in Pacific Rim Law & Policy Journal Vol. 21 NO. 3, pp. 427-431
5:
*
Visit to Edo-Tokyo Museum/Great Kanto Earthquake Memorial Museum
6:
*
Visit to Edo-Tokyo Museum/Great Kanto Earthquake Memorial Museum
7:
*
Visit to National Museum of Nature and Science,Tokyo
8:
*
Visit to National Museum of Nature and Science,Tokyo
9:
*
Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012
Part IV. History and Politics
10. Dealing With Disaster, Peter Duus
pp. 173-187
11. The Politics of Natural Disaster, Nuclear Crisis and Recovery, Jeff Kingston
pp. 188-206
12. Friends in Need: 'Operation Tomodachi' and the Politics of US Military Disaster Relief in Japan, Chris Ames and Yuiko Koguchi-Ames
pp. 207-220

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Armitage, Richard L. and Joseph S. Nye, The US Japan Alliance (Washington: CSIS), 2012


-------------------------------------------------------------------

Reading:
Jeff Kingston (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012

Part V. Recovery and Reconstruction
13. The Economic Fallout: Japan's Post-3/11 Challenges, Kenneth Neil Cukier
pp. 221-236
14. Ageing Society, Health Issues and Disaster: Assessing 3/11, Junko Otani
pp. 237-254
15. Thousand-Year Event: Towards Reconstructing Communities, Riccardo Tossani
pp. 255-276
16. Can Post-3/11 Japan overcome 20 years of drift? Kazuhiko Togo
pp. 277

Extra optional reading, suggested and recommended:

Patrick, Hugh, "Abenomics: Japan's New Economic Policy Package" dated July 2013 in Center on Japanese Economy and Business Occasional Paper Series No. 62 (NY: Columbia University Center on Japanese Economy and Business), 2013
10:
*
Japan in the World (Contemporary Japanese Society)

Readings:
(1) Screening of selected scenes from Lost in Translation with powerpoint presentation of social trends in Japan in the contemporary post-Bubble generation.
Tutorial:
Short class presentation in groups. Class participants get together in groups to go through a critical analysis of readings covered in the class up to this point of time, class participants will identify, categorize and compartmentalize major arguments while formulating a theme for their respective teams in preparation for class presentation. Sample final papers given out. Comparative exercise: make comparisons between Japan and other countries.
11:
*
Conclusion to the course reading materials: A summary of major features

Briefing and Powerpoint for artefacts in the Edo-Tokyo Museum

Briefing for requirements of the class presentations and marking scheme
12:
*
Class presentations on written projects
13:
*
Class presentations on written projects
14:
*
Class presentations on written projects
15:
*
Conclusion and Summary
Textbooks Kingston, Jeff, Contemporary Japan: History, Politics, and Social Change since the 1980s, Second Edition (US: Wiley-Blackwell), 2012

- Kingston, Jeff (editor), Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan Response and recovery after Japan's 3/11 (London and NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis), 2012

※Related sections of the textbooks will be distributed.
Reference Optional readings: For reference only.

Armitage, Richard L. and Joseph S. Nye, The US Japan Alliance (Washington: CSIS), 2012

Fukurai, Hiroshi, "Introduction The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Disaster and the future of Nuclear Energy Programs in Japan and East Asia" dated June 2012 in Pacific Rim Law & Policy Journal Vol. 21 NO. 3, pp. 427-431

Johnson, Chalmers, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (California: Stanford University Press), 1982, pp. 4-34

Leonard, Herman B. "Dutch", "Preliminary Observations on the Japanese 3/11 Earthquake and Tsunami" dated 12 March 2011 in Harvard Kennedy School Program on Crisis Leadership [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015], available at http://www.ash.harvard.edu/extension/ash/docs/earthquake.pdf

Matanle, P., "The great east Japan earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear metldown: Towards the (re)construction of a safe, sustainable, and compassionate society in Japan's shrinking regions" in Local Environment 16 (9), pp. 823-847

Ministry of the Environment Japan, Lessons from Minamata Disease and Mercury Management in Japan (Japan: Ministry of the Environment), 2013

Osa, Yukie, "The Growing Role of NGOs in Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance in East Asia" in Japan Center for International Exchange (JCIE/USA) website [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015] (Japan: JCIE), available at http://www.jcie.org/researchpdfs/growingforce/5_Osa.pdf, pp. 66-89 [Read mainly the part on Japan]

Patrick, Hugh, "Abenomics: Japan's New Economic Policy Package" dated July 2013 in Center on Japanese Economy and Business Occasional Paper Series No. 62 (NY: Columbia University Center on Japanese Economy and Business), 2013

Tatsuki, Shigeo, "The Kobe Earthquake and the Renaissance of Volunteerism in Japan" dated March 2000 in Kwasei Gakuin website [downloaded on 6 Jan 2015], available at http://www.kwansei.ac.jp/s_sociology/kiyou/87/87-ch12.pdf, pp. 185-196
Evaluation
Rate Evaluation Criteria
Exam: 50% Evaluation.
---Take home exam paper 50%. Question provided on week 5 and due on week 9. 1000 word response, including footnotes and bibliography.
(1 broadly-constructed essay question to elicit response from class participation)
CRITERIA FOR ESSAY GRADING
*Issues clearly identified?
*clear and logical framework for organizing discussion?
*appropriate material selected?
*wide reading from many sources?
*linking of material between sections?
*Argumentation and analysis?
*Coherence?
*Logically related answer?
*sophisticated analysis?
*new ideas and innovative thinking?
*processing of information: relationship of facts or concepts?
*balanced without dogmatism?
*support from literature?
Class Participation: 25% Class participation 25%
Evaluation criteria: based on active class attendance and engagement in class discussions and debates.
Others: 25% Presentation 25%;
Based on presentation of essay project, grading criteria for the Powerpoint (PPT) presentation are:
CRITERIA FOR PRESENTATION GRADING
-Issues clearly identified?
*Clear and logical framework for organizing discussion?
*Argumentation and analysis?
*Coherence?
*Processing of information: relationship of facts or concepts?
*Balanced without dogmatism?
Note / URL Main Language: English medium. Accept points of clarification and short enquiries in Mandarin Chinese, Cantonese or Japanese. 

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