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  • Even after classes have commenced, course descriptions and online syllabus information may be subject to change according to the size of each class and the students' comprehension level.

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Course Information

Year 2017  School Center for International Education
Course Title
Summer Session (Economics I) 01

Instructor WIDDOWS, Kealoha Lee
Term/Day/Period summer quarter  othersothers
Category Global Studies Eligible Year 1st year and above Credits 2
Classroom 実施場所未定 Campus waseda
Course Key 9800005015 Course Class Code 01
Main Language English
  Course Code ECNE101L
First Academic disciplines Economics
Second Academic disciplines Economics in General
Third Academic disciplines Economics in General
Level Beginner, initial or introductory Types of lesson Lecture
  Open Courses

Syllabus Information

Latest Update:2017/01/17 11:03:16

Subtitle Encountering Tokyo: A Look at the History, Business, Politics, Culture, and Economics
of the World’s Most Fascinating City
Course Outline

The primary text for this course is the great city of Tokyo.  Largely burned to the ground in World War II, Tokyo rose from the ashes to become the largest metropolitan economy in the world and a global epicenter for finance, business, media, technology, and pop culture.  Through a series of readings, moderated discussions, as well as field assignments designed to help you to actively engage sites and institutions around the city of Tokyo, we will interrogate Tokyo’s recent history, current economic and political challenges, and the lifestyle of its residents through a multi-disciplinary lens.

Objectives Students who complete this course will have a broad understanding of the history of the city of Tokyo; the issue of food security; the vicissitudes of the iconic technology company, Sony and what this may portend for Japanese business; aspects of the daily lives of Tokyoites including food and transportation; and the current employment outlook for the traditional salaryman as well as NEETS – young people Not in Education, Employment, or Training.
Course Schedule
1:
Introduction/Orientation

Monday, June 26, 9-10:30AM

Students and professor introduce themselves and review the syllabus.

Divide into groups and introduce the final project.  Each group should submit a list of their members’ names, email addresses, and cell phone numbers.  We will divide into approximately six groups.  Each group should comprise at least two nationalities. Groups are responsible for scheduling meetings outside of regular class hours to work on the presentation.

 

Lecture on the history of modern Tokyo

2:
Introduction/Orientation
   Monday, June 26, 10:40-12:10 AM

 Discussion: What are your first impressions of Tokyo?  How to use your notebook for field observations (see appendix at the end of this syllabus for suggestions on approaches to this kind of research)

 

Reading assignments for next class:

Mansfield,Stephen.  Tokyo:  A Cultural History (New York:  Oxford University Press), 2009, Chapters 4 and 8.

 

Iwatake, Mikaka, “From a Shogunal City to a Life City: Tokyo between Two Fin-de-siecles.” In Nicholas Fieve and Paul Waley, eds., Japanese Capitals in Historical Perspective(New York:  Routledge Curzon), 2009,pp.233-56.

 

Waley, Paul, “Rescripting the city:  Tokyo from Ugly Duckling to Cool Cat.”  Japan Forum, 18, pp.361-80.

Homework for all groups: Walking tour of Marunouchi Area (walking guide provided on Course Navi).  Short response paper on any of the three questions at the end of the handout due at the beginning of the next class (2 pages typed). You should also discuss how what you observe connects to the readings by Mansfield, Iwatake, and Waley.  Due Monday,July 3, at the beginning of class to allow you to complete the walk on the weekend.

3:
Field Trip to Edo-Tokyo Museum

Wednesday,  June 28

Meet in lobby of Building 22 at 9 AM to walk together to Waseda Station on the Tozai line. Please be on time. Please bring 560 yen for round trip train fare and 500 yen for museum entrance fee.  Note that travel time is approximately 45 minutes each way, allowing those who need to return to Waseda for class a maximum of 90 minutes to view the museum.

Reading for next class: “Tokyo’s First Trains” in Alisa Freedman, Tokyo in Transit:Japanese Culture on the Rails and the Road (Stanford, California:  Stanford University Press), 2011, pp. 1-67.


Homework for next class:  Tokyo public transportation vehicles and stations are unique social and cultural places that provide a unique look at the effect of urbanization on people.  Each group will explore a different aspect of the transportation system.  Each person should turn in your typed field notes (2 pages) at the beginning of the next class.  Remember that your field notes should concentrate on what happens that you think is significant, not just a list of everything that you see.  Be sure to connect your observations to what you learned by reading Alisa Freedman.

 

Group 1: Take a 30-minute ride on the Yamanote line and make notes on what you see.

Group 2:  Take a 30-minute ride on any Tokyo metro line and make notes on what you see.

Group 3:  Spend 30 minutes in Ikebukuro or Shinjuku station and make notes on what you see.

Group 4: Take a 30-minute ride on the Toden Arakawa (Tokyo’s last surviving streetcar of a once extensive line) and make notes on what you see.

4:
Field Trip to Edo-Tokyo Museum

Wednesday,  June 30

Meet in lobby of Building 22 at 9 AM to walk together to Waseda Station on the Tozailine. Please be on time. Please bring 560 yen for round trip train fare and500 yen for museum entrance fee.  Note that travel time is approximately 45 minutes each way, allowing those who need to return to Waseda for class a maximum of 90 minutes to view the museum.

Reading for next class: “Tokyo’s First Trains” in Alisa Freedman, Tokyo in Transit:Japanese Culture on the Rails and the Road (Stanford, California:  Stanford University Press), 2011, pp. 1-67.

 

Homework for next class:  Tokyo public transportation vehicles and stations are unique social and cultural places that provide a unique look at the effect of urbanization on people.  Each group will explore a different aspect of the transportation system.  Each person should turn in your typed field notes (2 pages) at the beginning of the next class.  Remember that your field notes should concentrate on what happens that you think is significant, not just a list of everything that you see.  Be sure to connect your observations to what you learned by reading Alisa Freedman.

 

Group 1: Take a 30-minute ride on the Yamanote line and make notes on what you see.

Group 2:  Take a 30-minute ride on any Tokyo metro line and make notes on what you see.

Group 3:  Spend 30 minutes in Ikebukuro or Shinjuku station and make notes on what you see.

Group 4: Take a 30-minute ride on the Toden Arakawa (Tokyo’s last surviving streetcar of a once extensive line) and make notes on what you see.
5:
How does Tokyo get around?

Monday, July 3, 9-10:30 AM

Lecture on the history of modern Tokyo public transportation and some of the ways it is depicted in literature and popular culture. 

6:
How does Tokyo get around?

Monday, July 3, 10:40-12:10 AM

Discussion:  What did you learn about Tokyo cites from your train excursion?  How does it connect to the readings you completed on the city of Tokyo and to the chapter by Freedman?How is this experience different from public transportation spaces and culture in your own country? What is the purpose of the pink women-only cars?  How else does gender matter in Tokyo transportation? What about social class?

Reading for next class:  Atshishi Sumi, “Is Sony Turning Around?” (University of Hong Kong: Asia Case Research Centre), 2011; Handout, Sony product timeline.  This case is several years old – what can you find out about Sony’s fortunes today to update the case?  Download the discussion guide from CourseNavi.

Homeworkfor next class:  Visit Akhihabara and go into any of the large electronics stores and examine the latest technology offerings.What surprises you? What delights you? What disappoints you?  Who else is shopping for these items? What is your impression of the items Sony is offering compared to other brands? Please turn in your typed field notes (1-2 pages) at the start of the next class.

MEET WITH YOUR GROUP OVER THE WEEKEND TO WORK ON YOUR PRESENTATION!

7:
The Role of Science and Technology in Japan’s Economic Development

Wednesday, July 5, 9-10:30 AM

Lecture on industrial policy and innovation in Japan during the “Miracle Years”

8:
The Role of Science and Technology in Japan's Economic Development

Wednesday, July 5,10:40-12:10 AM

Discussion:  What happened to Sony?  Do the troubles of Sony mean that Japan has lost its position as a world leader in technology? Why? Is this even an important discussion to have?

Reading for next class:

Hashimoto and Higuchi,“Issues Facing the Japanese Labor Market” in Takatoshi, Patrick and Weinstein,eds.  Reviving Japan’s Economy:Problems and Prescriptions, MIT Press, 2005, pp. 341-381; TokyoMetropolitan Government Overview of Tokyo: History, Geography and Population http://www.metro.tokyo.jp/ENGLISH/PROFILE/overview03.htm

Dasgupta, Romit.  “Emotional Spaces and Places of Salaryman Anxiety in Tokyo Sonata,” Japanese Studies, 31:3 (December2-11).

 

Homework for next class:  Observe Tokyo at work. Each person should turn in a typed summary of his or her field notes at the beginning of the next class. How do your observations relate to the readings?

 

Group 1:  Visit any construction site (there are many around Waseda) and take field notes on how the work seems to be organized and undertaken. What are your impressions? How does your observation compare to what you might see in your own country?

Group 2:  Ride public transportation, preferably the Yamanote Line, sometime between 8 and 9 pm. Who seems to be coming and going? How do they behave? What inferences do you draw from your observations?

Group 3:  Visit any large department store.  Who works there?  How is the work organized?  How is this space different than retail space in your own country?  If possible, make as mall purchase and observe how the transaction is handled.

Group 4:  What seem to be normal working days and working hours in Tokyo?  Explain your methodology.  What aspects of Tokyo drive and are driven by working hours?   How does this differ from your own country?

 

MEET WITH YOUR GROUP TO WORK ON YOUR PRESENTATION!

9:
The Tokyo Labor Market: Salarymen, NEETS, and the Homeless

Monday,July 10, 9-10:30 AM

Lecture on the demographic trends in Japan and in Tokyo in particular. We will examine the difference between the daytime and night time populations and the commuting pattern as well as what is happening in rural prefectures.
10:
The Tokyo Labor Market: Salarymen, NEETS, and the Homeless

Monday, July 10, 10:40-12:10AM

Discussion:  What are the implications of Japan’s aging population? What is the life of a salaryman like? What jobs do you observe women doing as you encounter Tokyo?   What can and should be done about the increasing number of young people outside of the labor force?  What can or should be done about there lativelylow participation of women in the labor force? How is this different from your country?

Reading for next class: Selections from Trevor Corson, The Story of Sushi (NewYork:  Harper Perennial). 2007.

Homework for next class: Tokyo Food Observations. Submit a typed summary of your field notes at the beginning of the next class.

Group 1: Visit a regular grocery store such as Santoku on Waseda-dori and make a list of ten items you recognize and their prices.  What would this item cost in your country?  What items don’t you recognize? Make note of their prices, too.  Take pictures or make drawings to ask your Japanese colleagues later.

Group 2:  Try to estimate the number of restaurants between Waseda and Takadanobaba.  What is your methodology? What kind of restaurants do you observe? How many are sushi restaurants?  How are restaurants/food in this area different from your home town?

Group 3:  Visit the basement floors of one of the large department stores.  What do you observe?  What kind of food is there, who shops there? How about the prices? How are wares displayed?  What does this tell you about Japan and the Japanese?

Group 4: The convenience store chain 7-11 has become quite successful in recent years, especially in the area of ready-to eat items. Visit a 7-11 convenience store during the day and describe the food offerings.  What do people seem to buy?  Who shops there? Who works there?  Why do you think that 7-11 has been so successful? 
11:
Itadakimasu, Tokyo – What does Tokyo Eat, and why does a pork chop cost 14 dollars?

Wednesday, July 12,9-10:30 AM

Lecture on agricultural policies and subsidies, Japanese food self-sufficiency, trade disputes and the TPP

12:
Itadakimasu, Tokyo: What does Tokyo eat, and why does pork cost 14 dollars a pound?

Wednesday, July 12, 10:30-12:10 AM

Groups report on their observations and discussion follows.

Discussion Topics include:  What do we mean when we say Japanese food? Should the government ease restrictions on food imports? Is Japan expensive?  What should be Japan’s goal for food self-sufficiency? How are Japan’s demographic problems and food policy related?

13:
Group Presentations

Monday, July 17, 9-12:10 AM

What will Tokyo be like in 2030?  Make five predictions and explain your reasoning. Presentations should be ten to 15 minutes in length and allow time for questions.

14:
Group Presentations

Monday, July 17, 9-12:10 AM

What will Tokyo be like in 2030?  Make five predictions and explain your reasoning. Presentations should be ten to 15 minutes in length and allow time for questions.

15:
Final Wrapup and course evaluation

Wednesday, July 19, 9-10:30 AM

Textbooks Readings and all other course materials will be provided on Course Navi. Students should purchase a small notebook and pen to take their field notes. Students are also responsible for their own transportation costs in executing the field assignments.
Evaluation
Rate Evaluation Criteria
Class Participation: 60% Discussion 40%, Final Group Presentation 20%. Approximately half of the class time will be devoted to group discussion, either in small subgroups or as a large group, so attendance is critical to the dynamism of the class as well as to your final grade. My policy on academic dishonesty is available on Course Navi and will be strictly enforced.
Others: 40% Homework 40%
Note / URL

Some Guidance on Ethnographic Research

 

Many of your assignments will ask you to take field notes on your observations in a particular situation or location.  Below is some guidance in how to select and interpret your observations for your field journal.  Note that this is not an exhaustive list, but merely some suggestions to get you started.  Individual assignments will have some specific prompts as well as these general ones below.

 

1.      Find a location where you can observe activity without being particularly conspicuous. Attempt to

stay in one spot for sometime, but feel free to move around the space if your behavior seems unnatural for the setting.

 

2.      Describe as much as you can about the situation or location. Consider some of the following

questions:

 

·        What behaviors and interaction patterns are prominent in this location? What behaviors did you notice first? Describe the major activities that occur in this space. Be as specific as possible.

·        Who uses the space and how?

·        What seem to be the rules of interaction? What are the formal or informal rules about dress, nonverbal behavior etc.?

·        What communication patterns are present? Who talks to whom?What common or characteristic phrases are used? If you detect repeated verbal phrases, write several of them down.

·        What nonverbal behaviors are displayed and by whom? More specifically, how is eye contact used? What are the implicit rules about physical distance and/or proximity?How (if relevant) is touch used? What body gestures/motions are used? What tone of voice is used? How do the nonverbal behaviors match verbal behaviors?

·        Are patterns associated with authority or status relevant to this space? If so, how? What implicit rules about gender and/or age are associated with this setting?

·        How does the organization of this space facilitate or impede interaction or the goals associated with the space?

·        What do the specific behaviors seem to mean? What values or assumptions seem to be associated with communication patterns?

·        In order to further enhance your understanding of this space,it may be useful to draw a diagram of the space and the interactions that occur in it.

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