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  • Even after classes have commenced, course descriptions and online syllabus information may be subject to change according to the size of each class and the students' comprehension level.

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Course Information

Year 2017  School Center for International Education
Course Title
Summer Session (Economics II) 01

Instructor WIDDOWS, Kealoha Lee
Term/Day/Period summer quarter  othersothers
Category Global Studies Eligible Year 1st year and above Credits 2
Classroom 実施場所未定 Campus waseda
Course Key 9800005018 Course Class Code 01
Main Language English
  Course Code ECNE102L
First Academic disciplines Economics
Second Academic disciplines Economics in General
Third Academic disciplines Economics in General
Level Beginner, initial or introductory Types of lesson Lecture
  Open Courses

Syllabus Information

Latest Update:2017/01/16 16:17:20

Subtitle The Changing Face of Japanese Retailing
Course Outline

Though long regarded as traditional or evenbackward by outsiders, Japanese retailing has demonstrated a remarkable abilityto adapt to changes in competition, consumer behavior and internationalizationduring the so-called “lost decades”.  This course will introduce you tothe many facets of Japanese retailing, from opulent department stores to“combinis” to tiny mom-and-pop operations.   We will concentrate onchanges in the structure of the retail sector through lectures, readings, casestudy discussions on Uniqlo and 7-11, and group fieldwork.  A final groupproject on the future role of technology in Japanese retailing will allow youthe opportunity to apply creatively what you have learned to an aspect ofJapanese retailing of particular interest to you.

Objectives Students who complete the course will have a broad understanding of the evolution of the retail sector and distribution network in Japan. Students will gain specific knowledge about trends in the retail sector and strategies for success in a deflationary environment and a changing global landscape. Students will also become familiar with the techniques of ethno-graphic research and experience working in teams on a common project.
Course Schedule
1:
Introduction/Orientation

Tuesday, June 27, 1-2:30 PM

Students and professor introduce themselves and review the syllabus. 

Divide into groups and introduce the final project.  Each group will submit a list of their embers’ names, email addresses, and mobile numbers.  Each group should comprise at least two nationalities.  Groups are responsible for scheduling meetings outside of regular class hours to work on the presentations. 

 

Lecture on the history of the Japanese retailing sector. 

2:
Introduction/Orientation

Tuesday, June 27, 2:45-4:15 PM

Lecture on more recent experience of the retail sector

 

Discussion: What interests you about Japanese retail sector?

 

Reading for next class:  Takei, Kudo, Miyata, and Ito, “AdaptiveStrategies for Japan’s Retail Industry Facing a Turning Point”. Nomura ResearchInstitute:  NRI Papers, No. 110 (October2006.)

 

Dawson and Larke, “Japanese Retailing Throughthe 1990’s:  Retailer Performance in aDecade of Slow Growth”.  British Journal of Management, Vol. 15,pp. 73-94 (2004).

 

Selections from Seidensticker, Low City,High City:  From Edo to Showa,(Knopf:  1970)

 

Assignment: As a group, take a walk along theroutes described below and make notes on the types of retail businesses youobserve.  What sorts of establishmentsseem to be most common? How large do they seem to be (in terms of number ofemployees)?  What strikes you assurprising or unusual about this retail landscape that may be different fromyour home country or from what you imagined Japan might look like?  What questions does your experience raise foryou?  1-2 page double-spaced essay dueTuesday, July 5, at the beginning of class. 

 

Group 1: Walk along Waseda-dori from Waseda to Takadanobaba.

Group 2: Walk along Waseda-dori from Waseda to Kakurazaka Station.

Group 3: Walk along Omotesando-dori from Harajuku Station to Ometesdando Station

Group 4: Take the Tozai Line to Nakano, exit via the North Exit and visit NakanoBroadway.

3:
Field Trip to Yanaka

Thursday, June 29

We will travel as a group to Yanaka to experience Tokyo as it was in pre-war days. Meet in the lobby at 12:45 PM and travel as a group to Nippori Stationvia Otemachi.  Please bring 400 yen for round trip train fare.  The trip takes about 25 minutes. 

 

Reading for next class: 

 

Fahy and Taguchi, “Reassessing the Japanese Distribution System.” MIT Sloan Management Review, Winter 1995.

 

Salsberg, “The New Japanese Consumer”.  McKinsey Quarterly, 2010.

Salsberg, “Japan’s Luxury Customers Move on”,McKinsey Quarterly, August 2009.

4:
Field Trip to Yanaka

Thursday, June 29

We will travel as a group to Yanaka to experience Tokyo as it was in pre-war days. Meet in the lobby at 12:45 PM and travel as a group to Nippori Stationvia Otemachi.  Please bring 400 yen for round trip train fare.  The trip takes about 25 minutes. 

 

Reading for next class: 

 

Fahy and Taguchi, “Reassessing the Japanese Distribution System.” MIT Sloan Management Review, Winter 1995.

 

Salsberg, “The New Japanese Consumer”.  McKinsey Quarterly, 2010.

Salsberg, “Japan’s Luxury Customers Move on”,McKinsey Quarterly, August 2009.

5:
Lecture on the Japanese Distribution System

Tuesday, July 4, 1-2:30 PM

6:
Lecture on the Japanese Consumer
Tuesday, July 4, 2:45-4:15 PM

Group Discussion of Field Observations

Reading for next class:  Nobuyuki Iwama, “The Change in Department Stores’ Cultural Facilities During One Hundred Years.”  Ibaraki Christian University, Department of Cross-Cultural Studies, January 2009. 

 

Assignment for next class:  Department Store Visit.   Each group will visit a different department store.  On your visit, be sure to look around each floor.  Make notes about what you see.  What is on offer, how is it displayed, who shops there, who works there? What other functions does the department store seem serve in the Japanese community besides selling merchandise? Any surprises?  What is your strongest impression?  1-2 page paper due at the beginning of the next class. 

 

Group 1: Isetan, Shinjuku

Group 2: Takashimaya, Ginza

Group 3: Mitsokoshi,

Group 4: Tobu, Ikebukuro

 

WORK ON GROUP PRESENTATIONS!


7:
The Phenomenon of the Japanese Department Store

Thursday, July 6, 1-2:30 PM

Lecture on Japanese department stores

8:
The Phenomenon of the Japanese Department Store

Thursday, July 6, 2:45-4:15 PM

Discussion: Groups report on their field observations.  What does each group have in common with the others, what is unique?  How can “mom and pop stores” co-exist with these retail behemoths?

 

Assignment for next class:  Visit one of the up and coming apparel stores.  Make notes on what you see.  What is the target market?  What is unique about the store environment or products on offer?  What is the role of technology, if any?  Why do you think the store has been successful, and is that success sustainable? 1-2 page paper due at the beginning of the next class. 

 

Group 1: Zara

Group 2: Uniqlo

Group 3: H&M

Group 4: Shibuya 109

 

Reading for next class:  Hirotaka Takeuchi, “Fast Retailing Group.”   Harvard Business School Case 9-711-496.

9:
Uniqlo, Zara, and H&M: Three Different Models for Fashion Retailing.

Tuesday, July 11, 1-2:30 PM.

Lecture on different models of fashion retailing. 

10:
Uniqlo, Zara, and H&M: Three Different Models for Fashion Retailing.

Tuesday, July 11, 2:45-4:15 PM

Guest Speaker: Zara from the inside

Discussion of retail experiences.  In what ways does culture manifest itself in Japanese retailing?

11:
Lecture on the phenomenon of the combini and the rise of 7-11
Thursday, July 13, 1-2:30 PM.
12:
Free time for working on group presentations.
Thursday, July 13, 2:45-4:15PM
13:
Group Presentations
Tuesday, July 18, 1-4:15.

How will technology shape the future of Japanese retailing?

Make five predictions and explain your reasoning.  Presentations should be no more than 15 minutes in length. 

14:
Group Presentations
Tuesday, July 18 1-4:15.

How will technology shape the future of Japanese retailing?

Make five predictions and explain your reasoning.  Presentations should be no more than 15 minutes in length. 

15:
Wrapup and course evaluation.

Thursday, July 20, 10:40-12:10 (NOTE THE TIME CHANGE)


Textbooks Readings and all other course materials will be provided on Course Navi. Students should purchase a small notebook and pen to take notes on fieldwork. Students are also responsible for their own transportation costs in executing field assignments.
Evaluation
Rate Evaluation Criteria
Class Participation: 60% Discussion 40%, Final Group Presentation 20%. Approximately half of the class time will be devoted to group discussion, either in small subgroups or as a large group, so attendance is critical to the dynamism of the class as well as to your final grade. Most of the assignments are field observations. Some guidance on field observation is provided in an appendix to this syllabus. I prefer that each field assignment is conducted as a group if possible, but each student must turn in an individual written assignment. My policy on academic dishonesty is available on Course Navi and will be strictly enforced.
Others: 40% Homework 40%
Note / URL

Appendix: Some Guidance on Ethnographic Research

 

Many of your assignments will ask you to take field notes on your observations in a particular situation or location.  Below is some guidance in how to select and interpret your observations for your field journal.  Note that this is not an exhaustive list, but merely some suggestions to get you started.  Individual assignments will have some specific prompts as well as these general ones below.

 

1.      Find a location where you can observe activity without being particularly conspicuous. Attempt to stay in one spot for some time, but feel free to move around the space if your behavior seems unnatural for the setting.

 

2.      Describe as much as you can about the situation or location. Consider some of the following

questions:

 

·        What behaviors and interaction patterns are prominent in this location? What behaviors did you notice first? Describe the major activities that occur in this space. Be as specific as possible.

·        Who uses the space and how?

·        What seem to be the rules of interaction? What are the formal or informal rules about dress, nonverbal behavior etc.?

·        What communication patterns are present? Who talks to whom? What common or characteristic phrases are used?  If you detect repeated verbal phrases, write several of them down.

·        What nonverbal behaviors are displayed and by whom? More specifically, how is eye contact used?  What are the implicit rules about physical distance and/or proximity? How (if relevant) is touch used? What body gestures/motions are used? What tone of voice is used? How do the nonverbal behaviors match verbal behaviors?

·        Are patterns associated with authority or status relevant to this space? If so, how? What implicit rules about gender and/or age are associated with this setting?

·        How does the organization of this space facilitate or impede interaction or the goals associated with the space?

·        What do the specific behaviors seem to mean?What values or assumptions seem to be associated with communication patterns?

·        In order to further enhance your understanding of this space, it may be useful to draw a diagram of the space and the interactions that occur in it.

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